After your healing session you may experience some of the following effects from what may be an otherwise productive therapeutic session. It is prudent to be aware that the path to functional and postural recovery is typically a little bumpy at times.

    • Sore Muscles: Be assured this is typically very temporary, though understandably potentially concerning. Sometimes not even the muscles that were massaged feel sore. This indicates intricate referral patterns and an inflammation response reflecting the complex biomechanics that were at play in the time leading up to your presenting injury and the efforts implemented to release them. For areas that feel bruised, it may be due to pressure on a very chronic (long-term) tight muscle group. If this becomes an unexpected issue for you, suggest to your therapist that the timeline for your rehabilitation can be extended such that you would prefer a more lighter pressure to avoid this situation recurring. Possibly massage may not be the best approach for you on the presenting muscle issue and it may be prudent to consider other options going forward. If you find yourself in this position let the therapist know and in the meantime PLEASE USE R.I.C.E [NOT HEAT ETC] as your best remedy to quickly pass through this post-massage phenomenon.
    • A Headache: Typically due to dehydration. Next time drink up a few hours before your massage. Sometimes headaches may also develop during a massage due to lack of sufficient ventilation. This means you need to breathe calmly, fully and deeply, all the way through the session.
    • Crying: Yes at times it can be confronting to have that particular muscle massaged or energy congestion released, especially if you’ve lived with the pain for a long time. Saying goodbye and moving forward can be a little distressing, especially midway through a session. It really is OK.
    • Spaced out/”Zonked”/Sleepy: Whether it be a very intense remedial massage or an emotional energy release the experience can leave one feeling a bit “different”. Best to take it easy, perhaps a light walk around the block before you jump back into the bustling world.
    • Thirsty/Hungry: Massage certainly gets blood (and all the other juices) flowing around the body. Those tight, knotty muscles will act like a sponge once it’s released, thus draining your circulation. It’s important to also realise that Blood Sugar levels usually drop, as does Blood Pressure, as a result of massage.
  • Bruising/Burst Capillaries/Folliculitis: On occasions your blood vessels may burst (causing bruising) due to deep pressure applied on those difficult and stubbornly knotted muscles. Whilst this can look and feel uncomfortable it’s best to weigh up the long term benefits.  Prepare for the possibility of this occurring before you book (especially if you have an event or on holidays), as bruising and skin blemishes may indeed take a few days to resolve. With Folliculitis, try shaving/waxing before hand OR suggest that the therapist work your body through a towel with compressions and trigger points only. If you find yourself in this position let the therapist know and in the meantime PLEASE USE R.I.C.E [NOT HEAT ETC] as your best remedy to quickly pass through this post-massage phenomenon.

If you still are uncertain about how you are feeling from a massage, then let your therapist know directly, either by phone or in person at your next visit. It may be that they can help you through the issue and further advise how to rectify in the future.

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